Pitbull Lab Mix: What To Know Before Buying A Labrabull

A Pitbull Lab Mix is a Labrador Retriever and Pitbull hybrid.

This cross brings out the best of both of these lovable dogs.

Labrabulls are playful dogs that will settle right in to any family environment.

However this breed also needs a lot of work and their personality can be difficult to predict.

This will be one of the most fun dogs you will ever have, but also one of the most challenging.

If the Pitbull Lab Mix has got your attention then keep reading to learn all you need to know about this four legged friend…

Pitbull Lab Mix

Pitbull Lab Mix At A Glance

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Labrabull

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Lab Pit Mix Puppy

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Lab Pitbull Mixes

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A Lab Pitbull Mix


The Pitbull Lab Mix is a lovable cross between the American Pitbull Terrier and the Labrador Retriever.

These mixes tend to take the best traits from each of their parents. So you can expect a social butterfly with very high energy. They make wonderful family dogs and are great for busy and active households with lots going on.

  • Popularity: #14.
  • Speciality: Companion.
  • Weight: 30-80 pounds.
  • Price: $300-$700.
  • Personality: Hyperactive, social and protective.

Similar Breeds

Rottweiler Lab Mix
Rottweiler Lab Mix
Price: $300-$600
Lifespan: 9-12 years
Family Friendly: Yes
Size: 70-115 pounds
Shed: Medium
Activity: Medium
German Shepherd Lab Mix
German Shepherd Lab Mix
Price: $200-$600
Lifespan: 10-12 years
Family Friendly: Yes
Size: 35-95 pounds
Shed: Medium
Activity: Medium
Pitbull Lab Mix
Pitbull Lab Mix
Price: $300-$700
Lifespan: 10-14 years
Family Friendly: Yes
Size: 30-80 pounds
Shed: Medium
Activity: High

Pitbull Lab Mix Overview

Lab Pit Mix

The Pitbull Lab Mix is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and the American Pitbull Terrier.

You may also know these dogs as Labrabulls or Bulladors.

This breed is classified as a hybrid but their parent breeds belong to the Terrier and sporting group dog.

They are most often kept as companion dogs for people who are looking for a loving and active friend. For the most part you can expect your pup to have the Pitbull’s protectiveness and strong will, and the Labrador’s hyperactivity and friendly nature.

However because the Pitbull Lab Mix is a mix breed their is no guarantee of their temperament.

The same goes for their appearance as they can inherit any of the possible coat colors and physical traits of either parent breed.

This is generally not recommended as a breed for beginners.

A Lab Pitbull Mix is extremely high maintenance and needs constant daily training and socialization.

They are generally recommended for experienced owners who know how to deal with high energy dogs.

Pros

  • Gets along well with children.
  • Very affordable dog.
  • Alert and watchful but not loud.
  • Easier to manage than a purebred Pit.
  • Very family oriented.

Cons

  • Cannot handle being left alone.
  • Personality can be hard to predict.
  • Can be destructive when bored.

A Day In The Life Of This Breed

Your Pitbull Lab Mix will rest at the foot of your bed all night.

A cold nose in your face or a happy zoom around the house will let you know they are ready to start the day.

At breakfast your pooch will follow you right into the kitchen so the two of you can eat together. Then they will follow you into the bathroom to help you freshen up.

The morning has just begun for them and it is time for a walk or run. Your dog will bring their leash right to you and drop it at your feet.

After your morning walk you can head out to work but you will need to call a trusted friend to come in and check on your Labrabull. They will hate to be left alone so make sure they have people around them all the time.

While you are out your Pitbull Lab Mix will pass the time by playing with their dog sitter and patrolling the house to make sure nothing is out of sorts.

Once you come home from work you should spend as much time with your dog as possible.

A trip to the park is a great way for the two of you to spend the rest of the afternoon.

This will let out any pent up energy your pup may have been saving throughout the day.

After a long afternoon of running and playing your pup will be absolutely worn out. It is now time for dinner and then time to settle down and rest.

A Labrabull does not sleep until their owner does. When you crawl into bed for the night they will be right beside you.

History And Origin

A Lab Pitbull Mix

The Pitbull Lab Mix’s history is a bit of a mystery.

It is generally agreed that this dog was first bred in the late 1990s during the designer dog craze.

Whether they were bred together on purpose or by accident is not known.

However most Pitbull mixes are bred intentionally in order to even out the Pitbull’s temperament.

These days this hybrid is bred intentionally as Pitbull Lab Mixes are rapidly growing in popularity.

Regardless of their history we do know much more about their parent’s history.

The American Pitbull Terrier’s unfortunate history begins in the bull baiting arena. In the 1500s dogs were used to fight bulls and this was actually a popular pastime.

Only the most aggressive dogs would win so the dogs were subjected to brutal training methods and bred for the most aggressive traits. When bull baiting was phased out these dogs were pitted against one another in the dogfighting ring. The Pitbull’s reputation as a vicious fighter lived on long after dogfighting was banned.

However lovers of the breed are still trying to raise awareness of this dog’s true nature as a loyal and lovable friend. They are often called nanny dogs due to their love of children.

The Labrador Retriever’s history is much more light-hearted.

These working dogs are named after the province of Labrador-Newfoundland where they were first bred.

They were bred to be the perfect hunting companion. These dogs would eagerly fetch and retrieved downed game birds, even jumping into the water to bring back a duck or a goose.

In the 19th century this breed stated to gain popularity outside of Canada.

The breed gained United Kennel Club recognition in 1903 and American Kennel Club recognition in 1917. Today they remain the number one most popular family dog in America.

5 Fun Facts

  1. The Pitbull Lab Mix is not a very well known breed but their parents certainly are. The Labrador Retriever is still the number one most popular dog breed in the United States.
  2. Because Labradors are so well loved they are one of the most popular parent breeds for mixes. The Lab Rottweiler Mix and the German Shepherd Lab Mix are very similar to the Pitbull Lab Mix.
  3. This breed makes a wonderful watchdog but a very poor choice for a guard dog. They are so friendly that they are much more likely to try to kiss an intruder than to scare one off.
  4. Unfortunately this breed can suffer from the same unfair legislation as their parent. Pitbulls and Pitbull Mixes are banned in some municipalities due to the Pitbull’s undeserved reputation as a dangerous dog.
  5. Labrabulls make a wonderful service dog as both of their parents are ideal service dog choices.

Temperament And Behavior

Pitbull Lab Mix Close Up

The Pitbull Lab Mix is both a hard worker and a lovable goofball at the same time.

They will be a very entertaining dog to have around.

Your mix will be extremely playful and tends to act like a giant puppy throughout their whole life. This is a very high energy dog that demands an active owner.

Anyone looking to adopt this dog must be fully committed to the physical and mental stimulation that they will need throughout the day.

Young puppies will be very noisy until they are trained not to bark.

The best way to do this is to ignore a barking puppy rather than validate them when they bark out of turn.

Once trained your dog will only bark when they are excited or alarmed. These furry social butterflies want to know everybody. They just look to meet new people and must be socialized regularly throughout their whole life.

This is the kind of dog that thinks everybody is their best friend and will excitably greet your neighbors.

They get along with all humans but their high energy means that they are best suited for children over the age of 10.

The Pitbull Lab Mix will be very destructive when poorly socialized or under stimulated. Knocking over furniture, ripping upholstery and scratching at walls are all behaviors to watch out for.

Bad behavior can be avoided by making sure that you meet this dog’s many demands at all times. Avoid giving your dog any sort of attention (positive or negative) when they are misbehaving.

Because of this behavior you will need to find a dog sitter while you are away – even if it is only for a few hours while you are out at work.

If you are going on vacation then your pooch will appreciate it if you take them with you.

Overall this dog can be difficult to handle but their loyalty and love for you will know no bounds. You are truly this dog’s best friend and they will feel a strong sense of duty to you and your family.

How Much Does A Pitbull Lab Mix Cost?

You should expect to pay around $300 to $700 for a Pitbull Lab Mix puppy.

Unfortunately because these puppies are sometimes too much for some families to handle they end up in shelters.

Shelters have a particularly high intake for Pitbull mixes of all kinds.

Standard shelters will charge around $150-$250 in adoption fees.

Age Price
Puppy $300-$700
Adult $200-$500
Adoption $150-$350

Labrabull Buyer’s Tips

  1. A Labrabull puppy typically costs only $300-$700.
  2. Whilst they might be cheap to buy feeding this high energy dog is very expensive. The best way to manage the food costs is to purchase a large one pound bag of food for about $55-$65. This should last approximately 2-3 months before it needs to be replaced.
  3. All Pit mixes need intensive training and many training courses will charge more to train a Pitbull.
  4. If you do not have a friend who can come in and check on your pooch while you are out then you will need to invest in a dog sitter – sitters will charge between $10-$15 an hour.
  5. The playful Pitbull Lab Mix needs plenty of outdoor toys that can stand up to lots of wear and tear. You should avoid cheaper toys as you will need to pay even more for the constant replacements.
  6. If you choose to rescue a Labrabull from a shelter then there is no guarantee of the pup’s lineage. It is worth adopting from a rescue that specializes in the parent breeds even if it means paying $100 more than a typical adoption fee.

Lab Pitbull Mix Appearance

Lab Pitbull Mix

Because this dog is a mix it can be difficult to predict what they will look like.

A Pitbull Lab Mix may inherit the single coat of a Pitbull or the double coat of a Labrador.

Also because they are a hybrid there are no official breed standards.

You should expect a medium sized and muscular dog with long running legs.

Their ears are usually round and floppy but they can sometimes stand erect if they take after their Pit parent. Most mixes have the Lab’s iconic otter tail.

Size

As both parent breeds are different sizes, the height and weight range of this mix can vary widely.

  • Adult males stand between 18-24 inches and weigh between 35-80 pounds.
  • Females stand between 17-23 inches and weigh between 30-70 pounds.

Colors

This mix can be a solid color or they can have a dark colored mask against a white background.

They can be one of the primary Labrador colors (black, yellow and chocolate) or one of the Pitbull colors (grey, brindle or red).

Also just like a Pitbull, their nose can match the color of its fur. If their parent had a red or blue nose, this may show up on the puppy.

They may inherit the Lab’s weather resistant double coat or the Pitbull’s close cropped single coat.

Your mix will shed quite a bit if they have a double coat but single coated dogs shed less.

Single coats are cropped very close to the body whereas a double coat is dense and fluffy.

If your dog does have a double coat then they should be brushed at least twice a week. Avoid taking your dog for a shave or a haircut as this can damage their undercoat.

Pitbull Lab Mix Care Guide

Lab Pit Mix Puppy

A Pitbull Lab Mix is a very difficult task to take on.

They are not the best choice for a first dog and are certainly not for anybody looking for an easy breed to keep.

Training and socialization are a lifelong commitment and you will need to spend hours physically and mentally stimulating them every day. This dog is naturally friendly but if they are allowed to run wild they can turn into a furry nightmare.

If you are committed to the work and energy that this dog needs then you will be rewarded with a loyal friend.

Exercise

The Labrabull will need at least 90 minutes of exercise a day.

So you should prepare to be on your feet with your newfound workout partner for up to 2 hours a day.

This dog must be taken out for both walks and runs (the longer the better). A walk or a run should last anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour.

Keep this dog on their leash at all times and make sure that they stay close to your side.

A Pitbull Lab Mix is a master of fun and games so they will not sit idly and chew a toy all day.

This is a natural athlete that is capable of all sorts of feats.

Distance running, high jumping and swimming are all of their favorite sports. Of course the Lab Pit Mix also love a game of fetch too.

  • Total Daily Activity: 120 minutes.
  • Activity Level: 5/5.
  • Favorite Activity: Fetch.

Grooming

Your Labrabull will shed quite a bit (especially if they inherite the Labrador’s double coat).

A single coat must be brushed once a week, while a double coat must be brushed up to 3 times a week. You should use a steel currycomb that reaches both layers of their coat. Keep your dog’s ears clean and dry (especially if their ears are floppy). Only bathe your pooch when it is absolutely necessary.

You will not need to trim this dog’s nails too often as they will wear them down while they runs and play.

Brush your dog’s teeth at least once a week to keep gum disease away. Dogs that do not like the toothbrush may be motivated by a tasty toothpaste.

Nutrition

Lab Pitbull Mixes

You will have never seen a dog eat as much as the Pitbull Lab Mix.

This large and active pooch needs about 1600 calories a day to keep them full.

You should split this 4 cups of kibble into two meals.

Their largest meal should be given just before their most active hours.

Your dog’s nutrition should be mostly protein, with a little amount of fat and carbs from natural sources. This breed also does quite well on a raw food diet.

Supplement your dog’s diet with fruits and vegetables for some extra vitamin content. Boiled eggs and sweet potatoes make great nutritious treats.

Growth Chart:

  • Your pup will gain 2-4 pounds for every 4 weeks of growth as a puppy. During their first 12 weeks your pup will reach 6-12 pounds.
  • They will gain most of their weight between 6 months and 1 year. This is when they will put on about half of their adult weight.
  • Your dog’s full adult weight of 30-80 pounds will be reached between their 1st and 2nd birthday.

Health Concerns

This dog’s big appetite can get the better of them.

Pitbull Lab Mixes can suffer from bloat which is a painful stomach condition that is often caused by eating or drinking too quickly.

Symptoms include vomiting and drooling and a visibly swollen abdomen.

Bloat should always be treated as a medical emergency that needs veterinary attention. It can be prevented by making sure your dog does not eat too fast and stopping exercise as soon as they eat.

In addition to stomach problems this breed can suffer from common joint problems. Hip dysplasia occurs when the hip joints are loose and do not fit into one another.

The condition is very common in large and active dog breeds. It causes pain, impaired mobility and can lead to arthritis.

Symptoms include inactivity and your dog being reluctant to walk or stand. Your pooch may whimper or cry in pain and may drag or limp on the sore leg. The condition can be treated with surgery but can also be managed with pain medication and physical therapy. How the condition is treated depends on its severity.

How Long Does A Pitbull Lab Mix Live?

You should expect a Pitbull Lab Mix to lives for 10-14 years.

How To Train A Labrabull

Labrabull

The Pitbull Lab Mix is very smart and very trainable.

However with this breed training does not stop at puppyhood – a commitment to this breed is a commitment to lifelong training and socialization.

This four legged people pleaser is happy when you are happy.

Do everything you can to be your pup’s best cheerleader.

Take a firm but fair approach with plenty of positive reinforcement. Bad behavior should be ignored rather than encouraged or validated.

When your pup gets something right let them know what a good boy or girl they are. Your praise will be their greatest motivator for a job well done. The Pitbull Lab Mix must be given plenty of time to meet up with both human and doggie friends. They just love the dog park and does very well in doggie daycare too.

They want to keep their body and brain busy.

Give them toys and games that require a bit of brainpower, and engage them in fun challenges.

Take the Retriever’s favorite game and put an athletic spin on it by turning it into a game of catch.

A game of catch trains your dog to follow commands and run long distances. It can be done with a ball, a stick or a Frisbee.

While you play you can train and practice commands like go, jump and drop it.

Summary

This mix is an active and playful dog that thrives around busy families.

You will never be lonely again with this fun furry friend by your side – a Labrabull is one of the most loyal companions that you can ask for.

However in exchange for their loyalty they will need to be kept busy.

This is an athletic dog that needs lots of mental and physical stimulation.

If you are doing everything right by your pooch then they will pay you back with all the love they have to offer.

When you adopt a Pitbull Lab Mix you are not bring home a pet – you are bringing home a new member of your family!

Let us know any of your questions in the comments section below…

John Woods Headshot
John Woods is the Founder of All Things Dogs and leads our editorial team as our Editor in Chief. A member of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers, he has been a dog lover since he was 13 years old. John is parent to Nala, a working lab retriever. John has also volunteered at multiple animal shelters, where he gained firsthand experience of rehabilitation and force-free positive reinforcement training methods.
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9 Comments

  1. I have a Lab pitbull mix and he is so hyper and fun and likes to get into stuff that he shouldn’t be. He definitely is a cuddler likes to sleep on my head like a head band or in my arms like a baby. His name is MJ and he’s the cutest dog I’ve ever had he’s my first dog I’ve never have owned a dog before and my friends and boyfriend are helping me raise him!

  2. My fiance got me a lab pitbull mix for my birthday hes 8 months old hes the sweetest thing ever. He listens pretty good, still trying to train him but he’s really smart!

  3. My son and I recently rescued a ‘pitbull mix’ and have been trying to figure out the other breed-After reading the various sources and looking at photos I am convinced Oz is a labrabull. I was nervous about adopting a pitbull but he is the sweetest most loving dog I ever met. He does bark at other dogs and pull on the leash so I am looking for a trainer to help with that. Any advice on that subject? There are no children in the home, just two cats that he treats with respect/fear and growing affection. He seems to think that all humans are friends who just don’t know him yet.

    • Hi Pia, He sounds like a gentle dog. It also sounds like he perhaps missed appropriate socialization before you had him. Is the barking out of excitement or are you concerned he’s stressed? If you are keen to find a trainer, look for force-free practitioners in your local area. To help with leash training, hold treats by your hip, this encourages him to stay close as he’ll want what is on your hip. If he starts pulling, simply stop and lure him back towards you. To tackle the excitement towards other dogs you want to counter-condition his response.

      So, start with a dog in the distance and reward him for staying calm. Slowly, move yourselves closer to the dog, reward him for remaining calm. If his emotional state changes, then move away again. This can be a long process, but you want him to understand that calm is the behavior you want, and that’s when he gets rewarded.

      • Love this! We recently adopted a puppy from the shelter. He was assumed to be lab pit mix. He is amazing! He joined a home with a rescue yellow lab and a rescue golden retriever. I’ve been working from home since we have had him. In a very short time, he was housebroken and sleeps thru the night with his brothers. We have plenty of toys for him which has been successful in not chewing anything inappropriate. He has spent minimal time in a crate – only if no one is home. And he has complete melt downs when in the crate. Tips on this?

    • We might have a pit mix too. Her fur is full on golden and her head and ears are pit. We are thinking of getting one of those dna tests just for our furbabies 💕

  4. I also have one of these breeds. His name is Brutus black with a white chest he’s about 4 years old had him about a year he’s my best friend. He loves his mama and can be very protective of me at times. I love this breed good combination of dog breeds his mama was a blue pit and his daddy was a black lab the previous owner of his parents didn’t intend for them to breed but they did.

  5. My husband and I just rescued an assumed to be Lab Pit Mix. We got him at 10 weeks, he is now 15 weeks. We are trying to get him to not bite so hard on us when he is playing. We understand he is teething, and we do try and redirect with the many chew toys he has!

  6. We just adopted a pit/lab mix from a rescue. She was shy of 8 months old and we got her as an emotional support dog. Due to her history of being taken then returned several times, she was not trained. In the short time we have had her she learned sit, stay, shake, high five. She has an issue with her kennel so we are still working on this. The biggest issue is her barking and howling when left alone, kennel or not. So that is our next training. I was honored to be able to adopt this sweet girl.

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